EduCam360

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Manufactured by Panasonic in partnership with Audio Enhancement, the pioneers of classroom audio, the EduCam360™ allows educators, administrators and security personnel to see the entire classroom—all at once!

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2014 Best of Orlando Award

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Each year, the Orlando Award Program identifies companies that we believe have achieved exceptional marketing success in their local community and business category. These are local companies that enhance the positive image of small business through service to their customers and our community. These exceptional companies help make the Orlando area a great place to live, work and play. Various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the winners in each category. The 2014 Orlando Award Program focuses on quality, not quantity. Winners are determined based on the information gathered both internally by the Orlando Award Program and data provided by third parties. About Orlando Award Program The Orlando Award Program is an annual awards program honoring the achievements and accomplishments of local businesses throughout the Orlando area. Recognition is given to those companies that have shown the ability to use their best practices and implemented programs to generate competitive advantages and long-term value. The Orlando Award Program was established to recognize the best of local businesses in our community. Our organization works exclusively with local business owners, trade groups, professional associations and other business advertising and marketing groups. Our mission is to recognize the small business community's contributions to the U.S. economy.

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News & Events

Course Access policies focus on equitable learning
Posted on Friday October 24, 2014

The answer to ensuring that all students have equitable access to the courses that will prepare them to be college- and career-ready could be found in a state policy known as Course Access, according to a new report from the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL). Federal data indicates that only 50 percent of U.S. high schools offer calculus and just 63 percent offer physics, meaning that students in the other 50 percent of schools don’t even have the chance to enroll in these advanced courses. But Course Access policies, funded by public education dollars, would ensure that all students have equal access to the online, blended, and face-to-face educational opportunities that help them become college and career ready. This lack of equitable K-12 course access persists in college and through to the workforce, according to the report, which notes that minorities and underrepresented student groups traditionally have low access to high school STEM courses, and, therefore, are underrepresented in STEM professional fields. Students often lose interest in STEM fields as early as middle school, and research shows that sustaining STEM interest through high school is a big predictor of college and workforce STEM participation. But Course Access can change that by offering consistent learning opportunities that sustain student interest in STEM. Classes offered through Course Access pass state academic and quality standards and can be offered in online, face-to-face, and technical formats. Students could opt for Course Access if they want to take a specialized class, such as Mandarin Chinese, not offered at their school, which is often the case for students in rural districts. In addition, Course Access is an option for students who wish to take Advanced Placement or other college-level courses not offered in their district. This approach also offers potential for increased personalized learning strategies.

School groups team up to help with digital transformation
Posted on Friday October 24, 2014

Many educators across the United States have made considerable progress in using technology to transform learning, and several school districts have advanced beyond small pockets of innovation to embrace systemic transformation. However, few school systems have found a way to create a fully enabled digital ecosystem that is continuously improving. To help school systems make this “digital leap,” three leading educational leadership groups—AASA, the School Superintendents Association; the National School Boards Association (NSBA); and the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN)—are partnering to share their collective expertise. The organizations’ “Leading the Digital Leap” initiative aims to empower K-12 superintendents, district technology leaders, and school boards to strengthen their ed-tech advocacy and adopt “bold, thoughtful, and scalable approaches that leverage digital tools in ways that personalize learning,” according to CoSN. The project is expected to launch at the end of the month with a website, www.leaddigitalleap.org, that will contain best practices for leading a digital transformation in schools. The website also will include practical resources such as an E-rate Toolkit for leveraging the federal E-rate to fund technology infrastructure; a checklist for ensuring schools are ready for online testing this year; and more. “Helping school district leaders take the ‘digital leap’ means new roles for district technology leaders, superintendents, and school boards, and everyone has to make that leap,” said Keith Krueger, CoSN’s chief executive. “The exciting thing about the Leading the Digital Leap initiative is that, for the first time, the major professional associations representing district leaders are joining together to help our school systems enact digital system-wide transformation. We are creating a common voice and suite of resources to answer the ‘whys’ and the ‘hows’ to make this vision a reality.” eSchool Media is a media partner for the project.

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